An inherent love for sports – part 3

Continued from here and here

Sports and Remedial Massage Therapist  this sounds the most practical of all the options I have explored. Given the number of running injuries we all get and the importance of recovery for our continuous pounding of the pavement, roads, trails and hills, a sports massage is one thing A and I wish we could afford more often. And one that every good runner does invest in at least once a month. This combines human science, running and rehab and looks like something I can practically do part-time. I can do this course over Saturday sessions over 5 months at St.Mary’s (a tad expensive at £1600). The fact that this can lead to practical experience to advance into physio / sports therapy makes it all the more attractive.

Sports therapist / Sports Rehab specialist – this is the closest stream leading to being a professional sports doctor unless I actually pursue an MBBS degree – it would take ages and a lot of luck before I could get to working for a big level professional club, and is not the reason I want to do this. But the line of work – sports injury prevention, treatment and rehab is exactly what would make me happy. I could at some point follow this up with a post-grad course in Sports & Exercise medicine.

It bugs me immensely when anyone vaguely suggests that exercise and outdoors is so injury prone that they would rather suffer middle and old age ailments. Someone said at lunch that people spend as much on treating running injuries as much as they spend on smoking! Even if this was remotely true, I would rather run, injure myself (oh, know how to prevent, treat and recover) than spend on that dreaded cancer causing nicotine tubes – I want to help as many people as possible believe in this.

Physiotherapist – Even though the sports therapist is the ideal path I would like to advance into, this page explains very well what I have read about sports-therapist vs. physiotherapist.

In short, Physiotherapy is a much better recognised degree compared to Sports-therapy. Almost all the Sports Physios I look up have done a Physiotherapy degree. And there are career opportunities with NHS as Physios which don’t seem so wide spread for Sports-therapists.

But the biggest difference I can see is that a Physio degree can be funded by the NHS once I have my Indefinite Leave to Remain in the UK (which I am eligible for from Feb 2016) – saving me £27,000 in tuition fee for the 3 year program! Given I really would like to be a Sports-therapist more than a Physio, I am hoping someone proves me wrong and shows me that the Sports-therapy / Rehab degrees also have this funding. For an added challenge, the funding obviously makes it very competitive to get into the Physiotherapy course – with only 35 accredited providers for all of UK.

Here is proof that Blogging helps – all these thoughts have been swimming in my head in all possible directions for a couple of months without an answer. It has helped so much to channel my thoughts into a piece of paper (ok, word and then wordpress). I shall complete my learning of Physiology & Anatomy and I think I will try the 1-day Leadership in Running Fitness course and also qualify as a Sports Massage therapist sometime next year. Hopefully these will help me understand my interest levels in pursuing more in-depth courses in this field and will also help with experience towards my application for a Physio / Sports therapist degree starting in 2017 (have to apply by the end of 2016).

And more importantly, I hope I somehow manage to keep – how long? – the non-loved job that would fund all this.

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